Tag Archives: Leo Tolstoy

Top Ten Tuesday: Favorites from before my blogging days

Top Ten TuesdaysOkay, I’m not only going to try to come up with ones from before my blogging days but ones that I haven’t mentioned or have  barely mentioned before on this blog. So that means no Anne, Doctor Who, Terry Goodkind, Twilight or Ender, among others. I promise.

1. Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden – Wonderful book about love in the most unlikely of places. Worth a read if you haven’t picked it up yet. The movie is also wonderful.

2. 1984 by George Orwell – The father of dystopian fiction before the term even existed. My freshman year English teacher gave me a copy of this book for reading the most books that year and I read it many times. It was one of the first times I was exposed to the idea of dystopian fiction and it has become one of my favorites.

3. The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Emmuska Orczy – A story about a woman falling in love with the man who just happens to be her husband. I’ve only ever read the first book in the series but I loved it.

4. Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton – I loved this book. Wonderful read with all kind of scary business inside. One of the few books that I read after watching the movie. The books are so much better.

5. Matilda by Roald Dahl – One of the favorites of my childhood and she continues to be one of those characters that stay with me even though my childhood is long since past.

6. Roots by Alex Haley – Wonderful book about a family’s history from Africa to the modern day through history. Wonderful book that sparked the most watched mini-series of all time.

7. Redwall by Brian Jacques – I loved this book and the many others that followed. I actually am planning on rereading them again int he near future. They are such a good read. The only animal based books that I ever liked.

8. This Present Darkness by Frank Peretti – This book and the follow up really got me thinking about spiritual warfare in a whole new way. While it id definitely fiction, the idea behind an impression even years later.

9. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy – A book with hundreds of character to keep straight and a very complex storyline. I’ve read it a bunch of times and always seem to catch something new.

10. Wurthering Heights by Emily Bronte – A plot where the main characters only redeeming quality is how much they love each other. Other than that, they really have nothing good about them.

There are so many others I could mention on this list. If you are a blogger what would you list?

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Worm's Obssessive lists, Top Ten Tuesdays

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I recommend Most

Top Ten TuesdaysThis topic is actually going to be rather difficult. To come up with only ten that I recommend most is tricky. Part of the reason that I did this blog was so that I could give better recommendations of what to read to people who asked me quite often what to read. Not everyone enjoys the same kinds of things and since I think the most important thing about reading is that you actually do it, I recommend whatever people are most likely to enjoy. That being said, there are some books I recommend more often than most. Here is the ones I suggest the most often in no particular order.

1. Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card – Great science fiction with wonderful characters and the start of two fabulous series of books that are still being written. Yep. Worth reading.

2. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery – I grew up on these books. I love them so much that I wore out multiple copies completely and had to get new ones. Definitely the one I recommend to my female students who are looking for something new to read.

3. Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer – I usually recommend this to people who have refused to read it before I tell them to. Normally these are people who have only seen bits of the movie and have no idea what the story is really about. While it isn’t the best thing ever written by far, the plot line is wonderful and the characters are so much fun to read. It was the first light reading that I fell in love with and was the books that got me started on YA fiction.

4. City of Bones by Cassandra Clare – I loved this series. The feels. Oh the feels that go with the story of Jace and Clary, especially in the first three books. Wow. This book is the definition of angst.

5. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo – This is probably my favorite book of all time. The story is wonderful and complex and tragic and amazing all at the same time. There is something for every mood you might be feeling at any given time. It is epic wonderfulness. Am I gushing? Yep. Is the book completely worth gushing over? Oh yes.

6. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas – This is a wonderful story of what happens when everyone betrays you and you seek revenge only to realize that living a life and being happy is more important than revenge. I ALWAYS recommend the unabridged version. There is so much that you miss out on in the abridged version of this classic. So much of the priest and his time in prison which makes the whole book make more sense.

7. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy – Completely tragic love story that ends so very badly. A cautionary tale of how love can ruin you completely. So wonderfully written with parallel stories running through it that capture the imagination. The ending is tragic of course but the whole thing is a wonderful read.

8. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern – This is a wonderful book that will caught my imagination completely and wouldn’t let go the whole time I was reading. Competing magicians who have no idea what is going to happen or how the competition will end.

9. Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind – If someone is looking for really good fantasy, this is where I send them every time but I’m sure those of you who read my blog know this by know.

10. Quiet by Susan Cain – I recommend this to every single introverted person I know and anyone who knows someone introverted and doesn’t seem to understand them. As someone who is an introvert, this book helped me understand myself so much better.

Okay, I’m sure there a bunch I would recommend that I didn’t include on this list but these are the ones I can come up with right now. What are the books that you recommend most often?

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Worm's Obssessive lists, Top Ten Tuesdays

Books that shouldn’t hit the big screen

Okay, I like a great movie based on a book just as much as the next girl. I can’t tell you how much I love the current trend of turning much-loved YA books into film series. I currently can’t wait for Cassandra Clare‘s series to make it to film, starting with The City of Bones. I’m also eagerly awaiting November and the final Twilight movie. Not to mention Catching Fire!

Even when a book doesn’t follow the book exactly, many movies based on books are enjoyable. Some eclipse the popularity of the book (Gone with the Wind or The Silence of the Lambs are good examples).

However, just because a book is wonderful, doesn’t mean that it always belongs on-screen. For one reason or another, these books should never make it to film:

  1. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway – If you’ve followed my blog for a while, you know that there is no love lost between me and anything related to fish. This book however is mostly a guy sitting in a boat by himself thinking and trying to catch a fish. Might be interesting reading to many (not me but many others) but it makes for some of the most boring stuff ever put onto a reel of film.
  2. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams – I’ve seen the movie. It was entertaining. Then I read the book and realized how bad the movie is in comparison. While Hitchhiker isn’t among my favorites, the book has far too much to ever make sense in film!
  3. The Help by Kathryn Stockett – While my review of this book isn’t up yet (it’s coming soon), I was writing the review and realized that I really didn’t want to see the movie. This book is a whole lot of people sitting around talking and the action sequences wouldn’t make much sense. I have a feeling that a lot of the depth would be missing as well. I just don’t see that one going well.
  4. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas – I love this book. It is an amazing read. I accidentally read the abridged version first and was appalled when I found out how much I was missing! There is simply no way to condense this story for film without losing too much of the story!
  5. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy – Again, far too long to condense down without losing too much of the story. Plus so much of the emotion in this piece would be too hard to translate into film.
  6. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy – 300 characters. Do I need to say any more?
  7. Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card – Okay. I love this book. I am going to go see the movie. My problem is that there is NO WAY they are going to find kids that are smart enough and young enough to play these parts convincingly. Plus the chance that it is going to be very cheesy is extremely high.
  8. The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce – I know you haven’t heard about this one on my blog yet. I have two reviews scheduled for this one because it is just that good! This one is all about a guy taking a very LONG walk. Definitely not something that I think will translate to film well. Internal dialogue books rarely do.

What books do you think should NEVER be turned into films?

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Worm's Obssessive lists